About Randy Vanderveen

 Grande Prairie Alberta photographer Randy Vanderveen is an award-winning photographer with two decades of experience. Editorial photography, commercial photography, institutional photography, aerial photography, documentary and humanitarian photography — whatever your photographic needs are in the Peace River Country of northwestern Alberta and northeastern British Columbia or beyond I can help. The right licensing package can make custom photography affordable and extremely effective whether you are a national corporation, a local business or a non-profit or NGO. I would like to sit down and talk with you about how I can meet your photographic needs. Call (780) 897- 6478 or email me for a quote on a job or licensing fees for photos. Feel free to check out the weekly Viewfinder blog.

 

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Entries in snow (2)

Wednesday
Feb122014

Catching up

Photo: Randy Vanderveen Beaverlodge, Alberta Taegan Bradshaw works with Ban, a horse she is training in a paddock on the southern outskirts of Beaverlodge., while a second horse Blaze watches the proceedings. The temperature, while still below average, was beginning to warm up making it a pleasant morning to be outside.

Wow does time ever slip away. I had no idea it had been so long since the last post. I apologize. Here are some samples of recent work. I hope you enjoy.

Photo Randy Vanderveen Grande Prairie Air bubbles circulating through algae growing in tubes provides an abstract image in this photo taken late last year for Grande Prairie Regional College.

Photo: Randy Vanderveen Grande Prairie, Alberta Deer look up from feeding on hay in a farmer's field southwest of Grande Prairie. Wildlife like deer and elk can cause extensive damage to bales on Western Canadian farms, although in this case it looks like the hay was spread out for the animals.Photo: Randy Vanderveen Wembley, Alberta Empty shot gun cartridges litter the ground near a small lake north of Wembley. Most hunters are responsible and will ask permission and clean up shell casings and spent cartridges.Photo: Randy Vanderveen Wembley, Alberta Steam rises from around the base of a rig operating south of Wembley. Farmers could be hit with higher input costs as the price of diesel, propane and natural gas have all been on the rise in recent weeks.Photo: Randy Vanderveen Beaverlodge, Alberta Elk feed on a bale in a pasture on a farm southwest of Beaverlodge, Wednesday, Feb. 12. Elk ranching, while not as popular as bison, remains one of the stronger non-traditional livestock species on Alberta farms. According to the Alberta Elk Commission website the current estimates for numbers of elk farms and farmed elk total 800 farms and 35,000 elk in CanadaPhoto: Randy Vanderveen Hythe, Alberta A tractor-mounted snow blower clears the night's accumulation of snow off the driveway of a Hythe-area farm. While the quantity of snow that's fallen in February doesn't compare to the amount which fell in November and December, there has still been enough to keep both snow removal crews and private residents busy removing the white stuff.

Tuesday
Nov032009

A taste of winter

Photo Randy Vanderveen Snow blankets the berries and leaves on a mountain ash tree following a pre-Halloween snow storm in the Peace Country late last week.

Well we had a taste of winter this past weekend as a snow storm descended on the Peace Country Thursday and Friday last week, Oct. 29-30.

The wet snow made a mess of the roads but provided a fresh blanket of white over the already dead grass. The leaves on many of the trees in the Peace are still hanging on meaning the fall task of raking will have to be done in the spring.

However, that is relatively minor compared to some unfortunate farmers who still have their canola crops swathed and laying in the field. Not a great end to a year where the economy was already in the toilet.

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An interesting note about the photo above. Those who are friends with my wife Cheryl on Facebook probably saw her take on the scene already. I shot the photo earlier in the afternoon  and held onto it until I could post it on the blog, while she took a similar one early in the evening and posted immediately.

The same scene grabbed both our attention, shot in different styles but with the immediacy of the internet, my wait means my photo is dated even though it was taken first.

That is a lesson for any would be photojournalists out there with news photos. Make sure if you want to licence a news photo to a paper or television station that you contact them immediately to ensure your photo is timely. By licensing I also don't mean giving your work away. If you have a photo the media wants, they should be willing to pay you for one time use. The more exclusive the photo and the bigger the story the more you should be paid.