About Randy Vanderveen

 Grande Prairie Alberta photographer Randy Vanderveen is an award-winning photographer with two decades of experience. Editorial photography, commercial photography, institutional photography, aerial photography, documentary and humanitarian photography — whatever your photographic needs are in the Peace River Country of northwestern Alberta and northeastern British Columbia or beyond I can help. The right licensing package can make custom photography affordable and extremely effective whether you are a national corporation, a local business or a non-profit or NGO. I would like to sit down and talk with you about how I can meet your photographic needs. Call (780) 897- 6478 or email me for a quote on a job or licensing fees for photos. Feel free to check out the weekly Viewfinder blog.

 

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Entries in feature photography (8)

Friday
Jul172015

A Different Look

Here is some recent work where most of the photos have a different look or technique to draw in the viewer.

Photo; Randy Vanderveen A horse and rider streak past the fence at the Evergreen Park providing a look of speed — the result of a slow shutter speed and panning.

Photo Randy Vanderveen The first of two photographs of a grass hopper. This one takes advantage of its reflection in the windshield of a car. Photo Randy Vanderveen This second photo implies damage caused by grasshoppers as the insect had moved closer to a large area of the windshield damaged previously by a rock.

Photo Randy Vanderveen Taking a close up, like this prickly pear bloom, can give the photo a different point of view. Photo Randy Vanderveen The similar colors of a butterfly and tiger lily highlight this photo. Photo Randy Vanderveen Isolating the subject of your photo by changing the backgrround or your depth of field can draw the attention of your audience. Photo Randy Vanderveen Not all of your photographs have to be sharp from front to back. In this photo the shape of the pumpjack out of focus in the rear is enough to identify it. Photo Randy Vanderveen Finally humour is one way of catching your audience's attention.

 

Thursday
May072015

The Remnant

It’s 70 years since the end of World War II and as we prepare to celebrate seven decades since VE Day, May 8, I wanted to commemorate the service of those men and women.
The years slip by rapidly and the young men and women who signed up to serve are now in their late 80s and 90s,
 I wanted to ensure they were honoured and to let them know their service was appreciated.. I talked to 11 veterans, there may be a veteran who lives in Grande Prairie and was not interviewed — please don’t take this as a slight — every effort was taken to contact everyone I was told was a World War II vet, to find out their memories of the end of the war. Since I conducted the interviews and took photo, one of the vets –Josephine Fulks –  has passed away. And that is why this project was undertaken to recognize these vets now – so they know they were appreciated.
In addition to this blog entry, there will be a story in the Grande Prairie Herald-Tribune and a display is set up at the Grande Prairie museum.
Please take this as a snap shot and a way of honouring all of you men and women who served in World War II. As a son of Dutch immigrants I thank you all.
For those interested in having a commemorative  copy of the display at the museum, a book mirroring the display can be ordered by emailing me.

Photo Randy Vanderveen Grande Prairie, Alberta 2015-02-11 Bill Gorrie, 93, displays a medal he recently received from the French government along with several other veterans in the Grande Prairie, area. Photo Randy Vanderveen Grande Prairie, Alberta 2015-02-11 Bill Gorrie, 93, attached to Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps Crossed D Day +1 Normandy into Germany spent a year in Holland after the warPhoto Randy Vanderveen Grande Prairie, Alberta 2015-02-11 Bill Bessent served as a Flying Officer in Bomber Command at end of war.Photo Randy Vanderveen Grande Prairie, Alberta 2015-02-12 Dick Beairsto, Flying Officer.

Photo Randy Vanderveen Grande Prairie, Alberta 2015-02-18 Tom Funnell, 90, Lance Corporal in Royal Canadian Army in Germany on VE Day.

Photo Randy Vanderveen Grande Prairie, Alberta 2015-02-17 Lester Reber, army Ordnance 93

Photo Randy Vanderveen Grande Prairie, Alberta 2015-02-17 Max Henning, Flying Officer, 226 Squadron

Photo Randy Vanderveen Grande Prairie, Alberta 2015-02-17 George Kusyk, 92, Tank Operator

Photo Randy Vanderveen Grande Prairie, Alberta 2015-02-13 Josephine Fulks, Petty Officer, Royal Canadian Navy, Post Office in London at end of war.Photo Randy Vanderveen Grande Prairie, Alberta 2015-02-12 Don Matlock, Craftsman, Engineering corps driver, in England when war ended. Photo Randy Vanderveen Grande Prairie, Alberta 2015-02-18 Ray Pollock, 90, Private in army Loyal Edmonton Regiment in Netherlands on VE Day.

Photo Randy Vanderveen Grande Prairie, Alberta 2015-02-13 Fred Dobbyn, 92, Sergeant Army Hussars

Wednesday
Aug132014

Summer wages

Photo Randy Vanderveen near BlueBerry Mountain, Alberta 2014-08-05 A freshly planted seedling remains behind Andrei Toma as he moves to the next spot. Planters will get paid a fee per tree and if soil or terrain conditions are difficult (i.e. very rocky or hard or a steep hill side), they will receive a premium per tree to compensate for the fact they will probably plant fewer trees than in more favourable conditions. I had the opportunity early last week to go with my friend Brett Henkel of Little Smokey Forestry Services Ltd. to document tree planters working.

Here are a few photos from the day.  One photo story will be running in the Peace Country Sun Aug. 15 and I hope another publication will be running a second different photo story in the coming weeks.

Thanks for reading.

 Photo Randy Vanderveen near BlueBerry Mountain, Alberta 2014-08-05 Dylan McMahon heads out with a loaded a bag of seedlings after treeing up. Even on a relatively easy cut block, it is clearly evident that just getting from point A to point B can add to the physical work out planters get as dead fall and slash areas provide a seemingly never-ending obstacle course to contend with. Photo Randy Vanderveen near BlueBerry Mountain, Alberta 2014-08-05 Marta Pawluk, a veteran planter with Little Smokey Forestry Services Ltd., plants pine seedlings. The job is a physically gruelling one as planters work in all kinds of weather and rough terrain. While this area was relatively flat there was still plenty of slash and dead fall for planters to have to work through. Photo Randy Vanderveen near BlueBerry Mountain, Alberta 2014-08-05 Marta Pawlik trees up at cache site after emptying her bag. Smart planters will work so they aren't carrying a fully loaded bag too far to begin planting nor are walking back to tree caches for long distances empty as they get paid for each tree they plant. Photo Randy Vanderveen near BlueBerry Mountain, Alberta 2014-08-05 Freshly loaded seedlings in a planter's bag which will be strapped on and accessed continuously.Photo Randy Vanderveen near BlueBerry Mountain, Alberta 2014-08-05 Remy Lamotte, one of the 2014 rookie planters, straps on his bag after treeing up and heads out to plant. Maintaining a good ratio of veteran planters to new comers is important.Photo Randy Vanderveen near BlueBerry Mountain, Alberta 2014-08-05 Mandy Cummings, a tree planter with Little Smokey Forestry Services Ltd. walks toward the landing zone for a helicopter which will ferry her and crew members out to a cut block where she will plant between 3,000 and 4,000 trees before returning back to camp. Tree planting is almost a rite of passage for university and college students looking for summer wages that will help cover their tuition.Photo Randy Vanderveen near BlueBerry Mountain, Alberta 2014-08-05 A helicopter with tree planters takes flight above slings filled with seedlings that will also have to be ferried out to cut blocks. While this site required an air lift other sites the planters will tackle over the course of the summer will be driven to in crew trucks or ATVs. Photo Randy Vanderveen near BlueBerry Mountain, Alberta 2014-08-05 Misty, a heeler, appears to want to get in on some of the action, carrying a stick past a sling filled with boxes of seedlings being loaded by Little Smokey Forestry Services Ltd. staff. Photo Randy Vanderveen near BlueBerry Mountain, Alberta 2014-08-05 Ed Smith holds a map showing the cut blocks that need to be planted. The cluster of lines on the top left of the map (facing reader) shows the rapid elevation drop from the boundary of one block into the Peace River Valley. Photo Randy Vanderveen near BlueBerry Mountain, Alberta 2014-08-05 Marta Pawluk, a veteran, plants a pine seedling. The blue ribbon behind her is dropped near where each seedling is planted. The flagging ribbon allows a quality control inspector to check her work but more importantly in green areas allows Pawluk to see where she has already planted so she and her fellow planters don't miss or double plant any areas. Photo Randy Vanderveen near BlueBerry Mountain, Alberta 2014-08-05 Dust from the rotor wash of a helicopter flies up as Morgan Schmidt hooks up a sling filled with seedlings to be cached in a cut block which will be planted. Each of the 25 boxes in the sling contain 360 lodgepole pine to be planted for Canfor.

Tuesday
Jun252013

I Get Around

Photo Randy Vanderveen, Ottawa, Ontario The Parliament buildings photographed in the twilight.If you have read my blog before — I know things haven't been kept very current — you will know that I will photograph subjects from different angles, times of day, positions and in different weather.

It is one of the easiest things you can do to bring a new look to something that you and others have photographed time and again. After all you want your photos to stand out from the crowd.

The photographs of the Parliament buildings in our nation's capital are a prime example. Each photo has a different look and sometimes even a different mood.

Sometimes looking for a different angle can even hide something you don't want seen.

A traditional head on photograph of the buildings in almost every one of these situations would have highlighted the ongoing construction and in some photos even the assembled stage ready for Canada Day.

By shooting from the backside or silhouetting the building those details were intentionally lost.

Why not try it yourself whether you are shooting a familiar landscape, a scene you have seen on a postcard or even portraits — break away from the usual.

Randy Vanderveen, Ottawa, Ontario A silhouetted building hides the stage set up for Canada Day celebrations on Parliament Hill.Photo Randy Vanderveen Ottawa, Ontario A rainy night provides a different look to a familar scene.

 Photo Randy Vanderveen Ottawa, Ontario A more traditional postcard looking photo of the Peace Tower and Centre Block.Photo Randy Vanderveen Ottawa, Ontario A different look at the Peace Tower framed between two other towers on the Centre Block.

Photo Randy Vanderveen Ottawa, Ontario A second non-traditional angle of the Peace Tower.

Friday
Dec142012

Lights, action

Photo Randy Vanderveen Grande Prairie City street lights and vehicle lights appear to be an explosion in colour as the zoom of the camera lens is moved during a 20 second exposure.It may still be a week and a half away but on behalf of my wife Cheryl and myself "Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year."